New York Times Editor Quits Amid Claims of Bullying and ‘New McCarthyism’ – Your AMAC Daily News

New York Times op-ed writer and editor Bari Weiss has quit the so-called “paper of record,” alleging in a resignation letter that she was bullied for expressing conservative viewpoints—the very reason she said she was brought on board in the first place.

“I was hired with the goal of bringing in voices that would not otherwise appear in your pages: first-time writers, centrists, conservatives, and others who would not naturally think of The Times as their home,” Weiss wrote in a letter to the newspaper’s publisher Arthur G. Sulzberger.

She said she was hired three years ago amid a bout of soul-searching at the paper after its “failure to anticipate the outcome of the 2016 election” and an apparent conclusion on the part of the publication’s leadership that the New York Times had missed the mark on what drove people in parts of America.

The priority in Opinion was to help redress that critical shortcoming,” she wrote, calling the opportunity to work towards that goal an honor. Yet in due course, she became increasingly disillusioned, arguing that a “new McCarthyism” had taken hold at the paper, forcing journalists to conform to an ideological “orthodoxy,” with the Twitter mob serving as “its ultimate editor.”

She claimed the paper came to view “truth” not as “a process of collective discovery, but an orthodoxy already known to an enlightened few whose job is to inform everyone else.”

“I was always taught that journalists were charged with writing the first rough draft of history. Now, history itself is one more ephemeral thing molded to fit the needs of a predetermined narrative,” she wrote.

Weiss claimed she was subjected to “constant bullying by colleagues who disagree with my views,” alleging that fellow journalists at the New York Times would call her “a Nazi and a racist.”

“There are terms for all of this: unlawful discrimination, hostile work environment, and constructive discharge,” Weiss wrote, adding, “I’m no legal expert. But I know that this is wrong.”

Further, she said her experience was not unique.

“The truth is that intellectual curiosity—let alone risk-taking—is now a liability at The Times. Why edit something challenging to our readers, or write something bold only to go through the numbing process of making it ideologically kosher, when we can assure ourselves of job security (and clicks) by publishing our 4000th op-ed arguing that Donald Trump is a unique danger to the country and the world? And so self-censorship has become the norm,” she wrote.

Her letter sparked a flurry of reactions on social media.

Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a human rights activist and fellow at the Hoover Institute, wrote in a tweet: “The New York Times was once a great paper. Not anymore. It is now held hostage by a small group of censorship terrorists. Yesterday they hounded out James Bennet and today it is Bari Weiss who must leave. Who is next?”

The Media Research Center, a conservative media watchdog with a focus on reporting liberal media bias, wrote in a tweet: “The @nytimes has proven that their paper does not seek the truth. @bariweiss’ resignation is just the beginning of the downfall of the New York Times.”

The New York Times did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Reprinted with Permission from – Epoch Times by – Rom Ozimek

CIA Filed Crimes Report in Russia Leak Case: O’Brien

A crimes report was filed by the CIA with the Department of Justice over a leak, national security adviser Robert O’Brien said July 1.

Raw intelligence that suggested the Russians might be offering bounties to kill U.S. soldiers was leaked to The New York Times and other outlets.

Data from the DOJ shows the number of classified leaks surged since President Donald Trump took office, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said this week, from 39 per year on average to 104 on average.

“We have seen targeted leaks of classified information against this president, and it is irresponsible: phone calls with foreign leaders, meetings with government officials, and now reports of alleged intelligence. Make no mistake: This damages our ability, as a nation, to collect intelligence,” she said.

The leak makes difficult to verify or debunk the raw intelligence regarding Russia, O’Brien told reporters outside the White House on July 1.

“Some leaker took it upon themselves in an effort to attack the president, or to maybe promote some policy agenda, to leak allegations that now make it almost impossible for us to find out what happened,” O’Brien said.     Zachary Stieber — Epoch Times.

Scandals involving Democrats in two races could damage party’s chances of taking the Senate

Two Democratic Senate candidates, Chris Janicek in Nebraska and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, are engulfed in controversy.

Scandals weakening two Democratic Senate candidates have dimmed the party’s hopes of regaining control of the Senate in the November elections.

Chris Janicek, the Democratic nominee running against Nebraska Republican Sen. Ben Sasse, is involved in a text message scandal that has resulted in calls from state Democrats for him to withdraw from the race.

“Do you think the campaign should spend some money on getting her laid?” Janicek reportedly wrote in a group text, which referred to one of his campaign staffers. “It will probably take three guys.”

A story from the New York Times quotes part of the woman’s response to Janicek’s comments. To date, she has chosen to remain anonymous.

“As a woman who stands up and beside other women, I can’t just pretend this didn’t happen,” she said. “I cannot support your campaign after what you said. I have integrity, morals and values but, most of all I have self respect for myself and fellow women.”

The Nebraska Democratic Party announced that it has withdrawn its support for Janicek’s campaign.

“Our party will not extend resources or any type of support to any candidate that violates our code of conduct and doesn’t treat men and women with the dignity and respect they deserve,” said Jane Kleeb, the party’s chair, in a statement.

Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is also caught up in a scandal leading up to the June 30 primary to decide who will face Colorado Republican Sen. Cory Gardner.

Republicans now have a 53-45 Senate majority, with the two other senators Independents who caucus with the Democrats.

The Democratic Party would have to gain at least three seats in November to take control of the upper chamber. So every potential win is critical, particularly Colorado, where Democrats had targeted a vulnerable Gardner for defeat.

Democrats will have a more difficult time stopping Sasse from winning a second term. Despite him occasionally being critical of President Trump, the president has already endorsed Sasse — a bona fide conservative whose race the Cook Political Report rates “Solid Republican.”

Story from Just The News

Welcome to America’s Cultural Revolution

We’re in the dawn of a high-tech, bloodless cultural revolution, one that relies on intimidation, public shaming, and economic ruin to dictate what words and ideas are permissible in the public square.

“Words are violence” has always been an illiberal notion meant to stifle speech and open discourse. Popularized by a generation of coddled and brittle college students, it now guides policy on editorial pages at newspapers such as The Philadelphia Inquirer, The New York Times, and most major news outlets.

The Times can claim that a harsh tone and a small factual error in Sen. Tom Cotton’s recent op-ed was the reason the entire paper had a meltdown, but the staffers who revolted initially claimed that Cotton’s argument for bringing the National Guard into cities put black lives in “danger.”

None of the Times’ editors, all of whom are apparently comfortable with running fabulist histories or odes to communist tyrannies, pushed back against the caustic notion that engaging in debate was an act of violence. They bowed to the internal mob and pleaded for forgiveness.  Taken in part from a  Commentary  by David Harsanyi—The Daily Signal